Sample Passages from Sifré on Deuteronomy:

Section 43:

"And you shall teach them diligently unto your children" (Deuteronomy 6:7):

That they should be well honed in your mouth. When a person asks you something, you should not stammer about it. Instead, you should state it immediately.

In a similar vein it states (Proverbs 7:4): "Say unto wisdom, Thou art my sister; and call understanding thy kinswoman."

And it states (7:3): "Bind them upon thy fingers, write them upon the table of thine heart."

And it states (Psalm 45:6): "Thine arrows are sharp [shenunim] in the heart of the king's enemies."
What reward is there for this? --"In the heart of the king's enemies; whereby the peoples fall under thee."

And it states (Psalms 127:5): "As arrows are in the hand of a mighty man; so are children of the youth."
What does it say about them? (verse 6) "Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them: they shall not be ashamed, but they shall speak with the enemies in the gate."...

"Unto your children" (Deuteronomy 6:7)

These are your students.

And thus do you find in every place, that students are referred to as "children."
As it states (2 Kings 2:3): "And the sons of the prophets that were at Bethel came forth to Elisha."
And were these really the sons of prophets? Were they not really their disciples?
rather [this shows] that students are referred to as children.

And thus does it state (2:5): "And the sons of the prophets that were at Jericho came to Elisha."
And were these really the sons of prophets? Were they not really their disciples?
rather [this shows] that students are referred to as children.

And thus do you find with Hezekiah King of Judah, who taught the entire Torah, and called them "children."
As it states (2 Chronicles 29:11): "My sons, be not now negligent."

Furthermore, just as the students are called "children," so is the master called a "father."

As it states (2 Kings 2:12) "And Elisha saw it, and he cried, My father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof."

And it states (13:14): "Now Elisha was fallen sick of his sickness whereof he died. And Joash the king of Israel came down unto him, and wept over his face, and said, O my father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof."

"And shalt talk of them" (Deuteronomy 6:7)

Make them the most important thing, and do not make them a peripheral matter.

That your discourse should only be about them, and that you should not mix extraneous things with them, as So-and-So did.

You should not say "I have learned the wisdom of Israel. I shall go and learn the wisdom of the nations."
Hence [in order to avert such reasoning], it says (Leviticus 18:4): "[Ye shall do my judgments, and keep mine ordinances] to walk therein" -- and not to become released from them.

And thus does it state (Proverbs 5:17): "Let them be only thine own, and not strangers' with thee."

And it states (6:22): "When thou goest, it shall lead thee; when thou sleepest, it shall keep thee; and when thou awakest, it shall talk with thee."
"When thou goest, it shall lead thee" -- In this world.
"When thou sleepest, it shall keep thee" -- at the time of your death.
"And when thou awakest" -- in the days of the messiah.
"It shall talk with thee" -- in the world to come.

"And when thou liest down" (Deuteronomy 6:7):

You might have said: Even if he lay down in the middle of the day--
Therefore it states: "and when thou risest up."
You might have said: Even if he got up in the middle of the night--
Therefore it states: "when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way." The Torah was speaking of a normal situation.

And it already happened that Rabbi Ishmael was lying down and expounding, while Rabbi Eleazar ben Azariah was standing straight.
The time for the recitation of the Shema' arrived.
Rabbi Ishmael stood up straight and Rabbi Eleazar lay down.
Rabbi Ishmael said to him: What is this, Eleazar?
He said to him: Ishmael my brother:
They once said to a person: Why is your beard so long?
He said to them: Let it be against the destroyers!
He said to him: You lay down according to the view of the House of Shammai; while I stood up in accordance with the view of the House of Hillel.

Another version:
Lest the matter be determined as obligatory,
since the House of Shammai say: In the evening every person should lie down when reciting;
and in the morning they should stand.

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