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Post Doctoral Fellows

Quick Links to Post Doctoral Fellows
Fabien Mavrot Stephanie Peacock Eleanor Dickinson Regina Krohn
Benjamin Padilla Xavier Fernandez Aguilar

Fabien Mavrot

Fabien Mavrot

Fabien is a Swiss veterinarian with a strong interest in wildlife and epidemiology. He wrote his veterinary thesis on infectious keratoconjunctivitis in Alpine Ibex and Chamois at the Center for Fish and Wildlife Health at the University of Bern and subsequently completed a PhD on gastro-intestinal parasites of domestic ruminants at the Section for Veterinary Epidemiology of the University of Zürich. Fabien is currently employed as a postdoc at the Department of Ecosystem and Public Health of the University of Calgary. His project focus on improving our understanding of muskox health in the Canadian Arctic. he will use a participatory approach combined with regression analysis to gain insight on the epidemiological processes driving muskox population. In particular, he is interested in pathogens that might be new to the Arctic, such as the bacteria Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae or expanding their range such as the lungworm Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis.
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Benjamin Padilla

Benjamin Padilla

Ben, a Postdoctoral Research Associate with a background in quantitative spatial and ecology, grew up in the northeast United States where he developed a love and curiosity for nature at an early age. What began as afternoons spent chasing frogs quickly blossomed into academic interest, and eventually a career. Ben’s research interests are centered on understanding the reciprocal relationship between human- and natural-systems, and on the way an individual’s worldview, such as spiritual beliefs or cultural context, influence how they observe and understand the world. His current research aims to integrate scientific and indigenous knowledge systems to understand the role of pathogens and parasites in population trends of Bathurst caribou. To accomplish this Ben is working alongside indigenous communities to co-produce research and monitoring programs to inform population models and management for caribou. When he’s not working on research you will likely find Ben exploring the outdoors, hiking, running, skiing, or climbing. You can read more about Ben and his work on his website - http://benpadilla.weebly.com - or follow his occasional tweets @bpdilla
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Stephanie Peacock

Stephanie Peacock

Stephanie's research interests span population biology, spatial ecology, wildlife health, conservation, and mathematical modelling. She is currently a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow working with Susan Kutz. Her previous postdoctoral research was in collaboration with Dr. Kutz and Peter Molnár and the Laboratory for Quantitative Global Change Ecology at the University of Toronto, developing models to understand the impacts of host migration and climate change on parasite dynamics in wildlife. As a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Stephanie is bridging scientific, local, and traditional knowledge to understand the role of various health indicators in driving changes in caribou and muskox populations.
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Published Refereed Papers

Alejandro Aleuy, O., Peacock, S., Hoberg, E. P., Ruckstuhl, K. E., Brooks, T., Aranas, M., & Kutz, S. (2020). Phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation in freeze tolerance and its implications for parasite dynamics in a changing world: The case of Marshallagia marshalli. International Journal for Parasitology.

Peacock, S. J., Krkošek, M., Bateman, A. W., & Lewis, M. A. (2020). Estimation of spatiotemporal transmission dynamics and analysis of management scenarios for sea lice of farmed and wild salmon. Canadian Journal of Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences, 77(1), 55–68.

Werner, P. A., & Peacock, S. J. (2019). Savanna canopy trees under fire: Long‐term persistence and transient dynamics from a stage‐based matrix population model. Ecosphere, 10(5).

Peacock, S., Bateman, A., Connors, B., Godwin, S., Lewis, M., & Krkošek, M. (2019). Ecology of a marine ectoparasite in farmed and wild salmon. In Understanding wildlife disease ecology at the community and landscape level (pp. 544–573). Cambridge University Press.

Kafle, P., Peacock, S. J., Grond, S., Orsel, K., & Kutz, S. (2018). Temperature-dependent development and freezing survival of protostrongylid nematodes of Arctic ungulates: Implications for transmission. Parasites & Vectors, 11(1), 400.

Kirk, D., Jones, N., Peacock, S., Phillips, J., Molnár, P. K., Krkošek, M., & Luijckx, P. (2018). Empirical evidence that metabolic theory describes the temperature dependency of within-host parasite dynamics. PLOS Biology, 16(2).

Peacock, S. J., Bouhours, J., Lewis, M. A., & Molnár, P. K. (2018). Macroparasite dynamics of migratory host populations. Theoretical Population Biology, 120, 29–41.

Phillips, J. A., Peacock, S. J., Bateman, A., Bartlett, M., Lewis, M. A., & Krkošek, M. (2018). An asymmetric producer-scrounger game: Body size and the social foraging behavior of coho salmon. Theoretical Ecology, 11(4), 417–431.

Di Francesco, J., Navarro-Gonzalez, N., Wynne-Edwards, K., Peacock, S., Leclerc, L.-M., Tomaselli, M., … Kutz, S. (2017). Qiviut cortisol in muskoxen as a potential tool for informing conservation strategies. Conservation Physiology, 5(1).

Peacock, S. J., Krkošek, M., Lewis, M. A., & Lele, S. (2017). Study design and parameter estimability for spatial and temporal ecological models. Ecology & Evolution (20457758), 7(2), 762–770.

Groner, M. L., Rogers, L. A., Bateman, A. W., Connors, B. M., Frazer, L. N., Godwin, S. C., … Schlägel, U. E. (2016). Lessons from sea louse and salmon epidemiology. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 371(1689).

Peacock, S., Bateman, A., Krkošek, M., & Lewis, M. (2016). The dynamics of coupled populations subject to control. Theoretical Ecology, 9(3), 365–380.

Bateman, A. W., Peacock, S. J., Connors, B., Polk, Z., Berg, D., Krkošek, M., & Morton, A. (2016). Recent failure to control sea louse outbreaks on salmon in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences, 73(8), 1164–1172.

Peacock, S. J., Bateman, A. W., Krkošek, M., Connors, B., Rogers, S., Portner, L., … Morton, A. (2016). Sea-louse parasites on juvenile wild salmon in the Broughton Archipelago, British Columbia, Canada. Ecology, 97(7), 1887–1887.

Gagnon, K., Peacock, S. J., Jin Yu, & Lewis, M. A. (2015). Modelling the spread of the invasive alga Codium fragile driven by long-distance dispersal of buoyant propagules. Ecological Modelling, 316, 111–121.

Peacock, S. J., Krkošek, M., Bateman, A. W., & Lewis, M. A. (2015). Parasitism and food web dynamics of juvenile Pacific salmon. Ecosphere, 6(12), art264-art264.

Peacock, S. J., Connors, B. M., Krkošek, M., Irvine, J. R., & Lewis, M. A. (2014). Can reduced predation offset negative effects of sea louse parasites on chum salmon? Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, 281(1776), 20132913–20132913.

Peacock, S. J., Connors, B. M., Krkošek, M., Irvine, J. R., & Lewis, M. A. (2015). Correction to: Can reduced predation offset negative effects of sea louse parasites on chum salmon? Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1813).

Rogers, L. A., Peacock, S. J., McKenzie, P., DeDominicis, S., Jones, S. R. M., Chandler, P., … Krkošek, M. (2013). Modeling parasite dynamics on farmed salmon for precautionary conservation management of wild salmon. PLoS ONE, 8(4), e60096–e60096.

Peacock, S. J., Krkošek, M., Proboszcz, S., Orr, C., & Lewis, M. A. (2013). Cessation of a salmon decline with control of parasites. Ecological Applications, 23(3), 606–620.

Peacock, S. J., Holt, C. A., & Fleming, I. (2012). Metrics and sampling designs for detecting trends in the distribution of spawning Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). Canadian Journal of Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences, 69(4), 681–694.

Krkošek, M., Connors, B. M., Ford, H., Peacock, S., Mages, P., Ford, J. S., … Lewis, M. A. (2011). Fish farms, parasites, and predators: implications for salmon population dynamics. Ecological Applications, 21(3), 897–914.

Xavier Fernandez Aguilar

Xavier Fernandez Aguilar

Xavier is a veterinarian passionate about wildlife. He is interested in the ecology of infectious diseases in wildlife, its interactions with livestock and public health, and its applications into conservation. Xavier completed his PhD at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and briefly worked as a postdoc at the Royal Veterinary Collage from London before joining the Kutz lab in November 2018. His work at the Kutz research group is focused in understanding the effects of pathogens in migratory tundra caribou and contribute to wildlife health surveillance in the Canadian Arctic. In his free time, he likes to play the guitar, drawing or enjoy nature through backcountry outdoors and climbing.
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Eleanor Dickinson

Eleanor Dickinson

Eleanor is a Postdoctoral Research Associate from the UK. Her research interests focus on the interactions between host movement and their parasites, and how these relationships may shift with climate change. She recently completed her PhD at Queen’s University Belfast, working on the use of biologging tools to measure movement and energy expenditure as well as predicting the transmission of gastrointestinal parasites in Alpine ibex. Her work will focus on the relationship between host body condition and parasite infection, to enable a better understanding of how parasites impact ungulate hosts in the Arctic. In her free time Eleanor loves to backpack, ski, horse ride and swim.
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Regina Krohn

Regina Krohn

Fabien is a Swiss veterinarian with a strong interest in wildlife and epidemiology. He wrote his veterinary thesis on infectious keratoconjunctivitis in Alpine Ibex and Chamois at the Center for Fish and Wildlife Health at the University of Bern and subsequently completed a PhD on gastro-intestinal parasites of domestic ruminants at the Section for Veterinary Epidemiology of the University of Zürich. Fabien is currently employed as a postdoc at the Department of Ecosystem and Public Health of the University of Calgary. His project focus on improving our understanding of muskox health in the Canadian Arctic. he will use a participatory approach combined with regression analysis to gain insight on the epidemiological processes driving muskox population. In particular, he is interested in pathogens that might be new to the Arctic, such as the bacteria Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae or expanding their range such as the lungworm Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis.
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