HOME PAGE FOR:

Tom Langford

Professor

Department of Sociology

University of Calgary

E-Mail: langford AT ucalgary.ca                  Campus Phone: (403) 220-5043

    - Curriculum Vitae, Tom Langford (updated June 2016)

INDEX:

(A) Interesting STUDENT PROJECTS

1. SOCI 461 (Worker Movements and Labour Unions)
    - LABOUR UNIONS AND WORKER MOVEMENTS: A FILM GUIDE (1998) (especially for Calgarians)
    - LABOUR UNION ATTITUDE SURVEY (1998)
    - WORKER POWER IN THE SERVICE INDUSTRY (1999) A Service Worker's Guide to Successfully Organizing a Union in Your Workplace

(B) Soci 461 Field Trip to Learn about the Strike at the Elkview Open Pit Coal Mine, March 2011

    - STORY AND PICTURES ON FIELD TRIP (2011)

(C) Some of Tom Langford's Own Scholarship

    - 1. Tom Langford. "AN ALTERNATE VISION OF COMMUNITY: Crowsnest Miners and Their Local Unions during the 1940s and 1950s."
[This paper appeared in the book "A World Apart: The Crowsnest Communities of Alberta and British Columbia," edited by Wayne Norton and Tom Langford (Kamloops, Plateau Press, 2002).]

    - 2. Tom Langford and Chris Frazer, "THE COLD WAR AND WORKING CLASS POLITICS IN THE COAL MINING COMMUNITIES OF THE CROWSNEST PASS, 1945-1958."


    - 3. Zia Rahman and Tom Langford, "The Limitations of Global Social Movement Unionism as an Emancipatory Labour Strategy in Majority World Countries."
[This is a version of a paper that appeared in Volume 6, No. 1 (Spring 2010) of Socialist Studies.]


    - 4. Tom Langford. "Five Decades of Class Analysis in the Canadian Review of Sociology."
[This is an almost-final version of the paper published in the Canadian Review of Sociology's 50th anniversary issue, Vol. 50, No. 3, August 2013.]


    - 5. Tom Langford. "Working Class Power and the Collapse of the Domestic Steam Coal Market: Lessons from the Crowsnest Pass in the 1950s and 1960s."
[This is a version of a paper prepared for a yet-to-be published book based upon the presentations at a conference "Resources, Empire and Labour: A Workshop on Globalization and Alternatives" held at Laurentian University in 2010.]

(D) Worth Remembering

ENOCH WILLIAMS, coal miner and mayor of Blairmore, Alberta, 1936-51, interviewed by David Millar in 1969 at the age of 85

All of this here comes from the resources of the country, the resources of the world, and God, if there is a God, he never put it there for the benefit of a few. He put it there for the use of all of his people. At least, I'm simple enough to think that. And the only way we're ever going to get to the bottom is say "NO, there's no more oil, fellow, and there's no more gold, there's no more copper, there's no nothing anymore -- all things that's in the ground belongs to the people. And it's going to be -- not for profit, but for use for and by people." And I'm simple enough to believe that that's it.
National Archives of Canada, MG 31, Volume 2, File: Enoch Williams, pp. 10-11 tf