Exhibitions - Events - Collections - Gift Shop - Links - All About The Nickle - Education

 

SENSE OF PLACE

September 23 ­ November 10, 2005

Organized by The Nickle Arts Museum, The Urban Lab, Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary and the Committee for Sense of Place, with support from Canadian Heritage Museums Assistance Program and the Alberta Community Initiatives Program.

If a sense of place is a fundamental aspect of our existence in the world, and if places are sources of security and identity, then it is important the means of experiencing, creating, and maintaining significant places are not lost It will then be of no small importance to know what are the distinctive and essential features of place and our experiences of place
Edward Relph, Place and Placelessness, 1976

This multi-faceted exhibition was put together to address Relph's concerns in this Alberta's centennial year. Using important places in southern Alberta, the show examines and asks viewers to examine why place is important, what makes some places appealing and others hideous, how do we experience and identify place? These questions are explored in a series of scrims and a collection of videos. Created by some of Canada's foremost artists, these videos include provocative work by Davida Monk and Arthur Nishimura, Andy Russell, Brian and Eleanor Kreiser, Jerry Krepakevich and Anne Wheeler, Janet Hawkwood, Linda Ohama, Jin-me Yoon, tom Daly, Loretta Todd, Stephen Arthur, Jack Lauder, Vern Hume, Joseph Paithouski, Brian Rusted and Alethea Lahofer.

The exhibition is complemented by a series of publications and a varied program of special events which include excursions into the cultural landscapes of Alberta, the 21st century city + urban design strategies symposium, Wild Words Centennial Literary Festival, noon hour and evening speakers. For the full program and more information please contact Robin Jaska at (403) 220-7324 or rjaska@ucalgary.ca

 

 

 

Return to Nickle Arts Home Page


For more information call 220-7234.
Admission to lectures, talks, and receptions is free unless otherwise noted